On Air Now

Upcoming Shows

Program Schedule »

Listen

Listen Live Now » 1360 AM Northeast, WI 97.5 FM Green Bay, WI

Weather

Current Conditions(Green Bay,WI 54303)

More Weather »
68° Feels Like: 68°
Wind: WSW 9 mph Past 24 hrs - Precip: 0”
Current Radar for Zip

Today

Partly Cloudy 75°

Tonight

Clear 56°

Tomorrow

Mostly Sunny 81°

Alerts

Report: Walker administration to issue new emergency rules for Capitol protestors

by
Protestors yell outside of the office of Wisconsin State Governor Scott Walker after the signing of the ceremonial bill, after the Republican-controlled House and Senate eliminated almost all collective bargaining for most public workers, at the state Capitol in Madison, Wisconsin March 11, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck
Protestors yell outside of the office of Wisconsin State Governor Scott Walker after the signing of the ceremonial bill, after the Republican-controlled House and Senate eliminated almost all collective bargaining for most public workers, at the state Capitol in Madison, Wisconsin March 11, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck

MADISON, WI (WTAQ) - The Walker administration is about to issue new emergency rules for protestors at the State Capitol.

Protests continue, two years after Governor Scott Walker first proposed the near-elimination of collective bargaining for most public employee unions.

Administration spokeswoman Stephanie Marquis tells the Madison Capital Times the new rules will formalize current enforcement policies in the state’s code, and update rules so they conform with recent court rulings.

The Cap Times said the administration indicated that it wants, “greater compliance from user groups in order to protect public safety and welfare.”

Rules that were newly enforced last year require groups of four or more to get state permits for holding protests and other events inside the Capitol.

The new rules would further describe the definitions of events and exhibits – and they would say that even common materials can pose hazards.

The administration’s drafting document to the Legislative Reference Bureau did say bring up the possibility of closing the Capitol for public forums, like the U.S. Capitol and some other states have done. But the document said the idea is, “not recommended.”

Comments