On Air Now

Upcoming Shows

Program Schedule »

Listen

Listen Live Now » 1360 AM Northeast, WI 97.5 FM Green Bay, WI

Weather

Current Conditions(Green Bay,WI 54303)

More Weather »
60° Feels Like: 60°
Wind: NNW 5 mph Past 24 hrs - Precip: 0.65”
Current Radar for Zip

Tonight

Partly Cloudy 55°

Tomorrow

Partly Cloudy 75°

Thurs Night

Isolated Thunderstorms 55°

Alerts

Romney casts vote, feels "great" about Ohio

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney gets into his vehicle after voting in Belmont, Massachusetts November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Brian Sny
Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney gets into his vehicle after voting in Belmont, Massachusetts November 6, 2012. REUTERS/Brian Sny

By Patricia Zengerle

BELMONT, Massachusetts (Reuters) - Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney cast his vote in a Boston suburb on Tuesday morning, saying he felt good about his chances of winning the presidency.

After voting, Romney kissed his wife, Ann, goodbye and headed out for last-minute campaigning in Cleveland and Pittsburgh - cities in the crucial electoral states of Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Romney wore a gray suit and Ann was in a bright blue coat as they voted side by side at a community center for the elderly.

Asked who he voted for, a visibly relaxed and happy Romney replied: "I think you know."

The former Massachusetts governor, who owns a house in Belmont, was asked how he felt and responded "very good, very good." As for his prospects in Ohio, Romney said, "I feel great about Ohio."

It was the first time Romney has spoken to the traveling media corps since September 28 - a five-week silence.

Later Tuesday morning, Romney's vice presidential running mate, Paul Ryan, voted with his family in tow at the Hedberg Public Library in his hometown of Janesville, Wisconsin.

Accompanied by two of his children, the smiling Ryan filled out his paper ballot and turned it in, before herding all three of his children out of the library and leaving to join up with Romney in Cleveland later on Tuesday.

(Additional reporting and writing by Susan Heavey in Washington; Editing by Bill Trott)

Comments